Calendar

For information about attending a Salisbury Cafe Scientifique event, see the Attending an Event section; there is also more general information in the Frequently Asked Questions section and help on making the most of this calendar in the Calendar Help section. If you fancy a night of science outside but close to Salisbury, there is also this filtered list of nearby events.

Jan
22
Fri
2021
Battle Blood – Dr Claire Roddie, UCL @ Online
Jan 22 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Claire is a Consultant Haematologist and Honorary Senior Lecturer in Haematology at UCL with a particular interest in CAR T-cells for cancer. She completed a PhD in Cellular Immunotherapy at UCL in the laboratory of Professor Karl Peggs and subsequently undertook a Clinician Scientist post in Dr Martin Pule’s Laboratory to work on the UCL CAR T-cell program. Claire’s current role involves pre-clinical development of novel CAR projects, GMP CAR T-cell manufacture and Clinical Trial design for academic CAR T-cell studies at UCL. She is also responsible for the development of a clinical service at UCLH to support patients recruited to CAR T-cell studies and those receiving CAR T on the NHS.

Jan
25
Mon
2021
Hydrogen: Its Role in the UK Economy – Professor Nigel Brandon, Imperial College London @ Location: Zoom. See CSAR emails for joining information.
Jan 25 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Abstract not available

Jan
29
Fri
2021
Transitional Bleeding in Early Modern England – Dr Sara Read, Loughborough University @ Online
Jan 29 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Sara Read is a literary historian at Loughborough University. Her expertise is in the cultural and literary representations of the reproductive female body in early modern England. She co-edits the history of medicine blog earlymodernmedicine.com. She is the author of several books, most recently, The Gossips’ Choice, her debut novel which is founded in her research specialisms.

The physiology of menstruation might be timeless, but the experience of female reproductive bleeding (from menarche, to menopause) is mediated through different cultural norms at any given time. So, for example, in early modern England, many considered that the onset of menstruation marked a girl’s transition to young womanhood, and postpartum bleeding signified a change to motherhood. Medical debates covering expectations about the regularity of the cycle, the reasons for absent or excessive bleeding, or indeed the theories about why women could expect to bleed at all were heated in early modern England. This lecture will outline the most common medical theories, describe the many words and circumlocutions early moderns used to describe menstruation, and discuss prevailing cultural expectations about this event.

Feb
1
Mon
2021
G I Taylor Lecture – title to be confirmed – Dr Debora Sijacki. Institute of Astronomy
Feb 1 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Abstract not available

Feb
5
Fri
2021
Blood in Motion: The Physics of Blood Flow – Professor Tim Pedley, University of Cambridge @ Online
Feb 5 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

This lecture will start with a brief survey of ancient ideas about blood flow, culminating in the West with William Harvey’s convincing demonstration – before the invention of the microscope – that the blood circulates in the body. The mechanics of that circulation will be described, from the high-pressure arteries to the low-pressure veins. Highlights will be: the propagation of the pressure pulse in arteries, the disturbance to smooth flow caused by the complex geometry of arteries (and its probable influence on arterial disease), the fact that blood cells have to be deformed and travel in single file in the smallest capillaries, and the interesting effects of gravity on the venous return to the heart in upright animals, notably those with long necks and legs – giraffes and dinosaurs.

Tim Pedley is an applied mathematician whose research has been devoted to Biological Fluid Dynamics, both internal (e.g. blood flow) and external (e.g. micro-organism swimming), for over 50 years . He is Emeritus G I Taylor Professor of Fluid Mechanics at Cambridge, and has served as Chairman of the World Council for Biomechanics, President of the International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics and President of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications

Feb
8
Mon
2021
The Hunt for Exoplanets – Professor Didier Queloz, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge @ Location: Your choice. See CSAR website or emails for joining information.
Feb 8 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

*Searching for planets around other stars*

Abstract to be confirmed

Feb
12
Fri
2021
Dracula, Vampires and the New Woman – Professor Carol Senf, Georgia Institute of Technology @ Online
Feb 12 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Dracula, Blood, and the New Woman: Stoker’s Reflections on the Zeitgeist

While Stoker’s Dracula has never been out of print since its publication in 1897, there’s a tendency either to inflate it as a study in the struggle between Good and Evil or to dismiss it as popular fiction. This talk addresses the degree to which Dracula wrestles with the problems of its day, including the rise of the New Woman, which challenged traditional notions of gender relationships, and the importance of blood as a marker of identity. The New Woman, which Stoker will continue to address throughout his career, finally points to the future while blood demonstrates Stoker’s connection to a very traditional past.

Carol Senf, Professor at Georgia Tech, specializes in Gothic Studies. She has written on Stoker, Dracula, Stephen King, LeFanu, Mary Shelley, the Brontes, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, and Sarah Grand. Her most recent book (co-authored with Sherry Brown and Ellen Stockstill) is A Research Guide to Gothic Literature in English (2018).

Feb
19
Fri
2021
Bloodlines of the British – Professor Sir Walter Bodmer, University of Oxford @ Online
Feb 19 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

The white cells of the blood are a source of DNA, whose analysis reveals our genetic makeup. Blood samples from different human population groups can therefore give us valuable information about genetic variation within and between different human populations, and so about the population interrelationships. A detailed analysis of the DNA variation observed in a carefully sourced collection of blood samples from all over the UK has enabled the creation of a “genetic map” of the UK that helps to tell us where the British people came from. We can even detect differences within the UK between people from Devon and Cornwall. By extending the study to Irish populations we can build up a picture of the origins of the populations of the UK and Ireland as they have developed since the end of the last ice age. Recent studies of DNA from ancient burial ground skeletons have, however, suggested intriguing differences from the modern populations. These may be explained by the burial sources of these ancient DNAs not being typical of the overall population that existed in Great Britain and Ireland at that time.

Walter Bodmer is a human geneticist and cancer researcher. Formerly professor of genetics at Stanford and Oxford Universities and then Director of the Imperial Cancer Research Fund (now CRUK), he now leads the Cancer and Immunogenetics Laboratory at the Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine in Oxford University, where he is an Emeritus Professor. His major current research interests are in the fundamental genetics and biology of colorectal cancer and their potential clinical applications, and in the characterization, analysis, and population distribution of genetic diversity in human populations.

Feb
24
Wed
2021
Honorary Fellows Lecture – Professor Sir David Spiegelhalter FRS OBE – title to be confirmed – Professor Sir David Spiegelhalter FRS OBE Chair, Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication
Feb 24 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Abstract not available

Feb
26
Fri
2021
Blood villains and heros – Ms Rose George, Journalist @ Online
Feb 26 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Rose George is an author and journalist living in the UK. She has written four books: her last was Nine Pints: A journey through the money, medicine and mysteries of blood. Her third book, Ninety Percent of Everything, won the Maritime Foundation Mountbatten Literary Prize in 2013. She writes journalism – features, longreads, opinion pieces and book reviews – for The Guardian, New Statesman, Spectator, New York Times and many other publications.

Rose has a Congratulatory First Class honours from Somerville College, University of Oxford, and an MA in politics from the University of Pennsylvania. She received both a Thouron Award and a Fulbright scholarship.

Rose’s website is www.rosegeorge.com

Mar
1
Mon
2021
Professor Sadaf Farooqi – title to be confirmed – Professor Sadaf Farooqi PhD, FRCP, FMedSci, Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow and Professor of Metabolism and Medicine, Department of Medicine @ Time and venue to be confirmed
Mar 1 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Abstract not available

Mar
5
Fri
2021
Cold Blood – Professor Stuart Egginton, University of Leeds @ Online
Mar 5 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

The presence of cold blood, whether through acute seasonal chill or chronic environmental exposure, imposes an additional burden on the hearts’ ability to pump viscous blood around the body, potentially limiting blood flow to working muscle. Of particular interest is how the ‘business end’ of the cardiovascular system, the microcirculation, adapts under these conditions. Here, intimate contact between blood and tissue is achieved by a vast network of tiny vessels (capillaries) that facilitate supply of oxygen and other fuels, as well as removal of waste products. This lecture will explore some strategies that warm-blooded animals use to cope during winter, and contrast this with adaptations seen in cold-blooded animals that thrive in the constantly frigid waters around Antarctica.

Stuart Egginton is a cardiovascular and muscle physiologist at the University of Leeds, where he is Professor of Exercise Science. His work explores biological limits to activity, and how flexibility is essential to cope with physiological challenges. He is a Fellow of The Physiological Society, currently a Monitoring Editor for the Journal of Experimental Biology, and has served as President of the British Microcirculation Society.

Mar
12
Fri
2021
Blood Sculptures – Mr Marc Quinn, Artist @ Online
Mar 12 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Abstract not available

Mar
26
Fri
2021
Quantum Informatics amd Quantum Technologies – One day meeting – Organised by : Professor Ron Horgan and Professor Adrian Kent @ Cambridge University Engineering Department LT0
Mar 26 @ 9:00 am – 5:15 pm

Abstract not available

Nov
8
Mon
2021
Dr Julia Wolf – title to be confirmed – Dr Julia Wolf, Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics @ Time and venue to be confirmed
Nov 8 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Abstract not available