Where in the world am I: A brief history of the science of knowing where we are and how to get from A to B.

A historic map of New Sarum

A historic map of New Sarum

The March talk will be given by Dr Paul Cripps of Archaeogeomancy, the Archaeological Computing Research Group at the University of Southampton and the Geographic Information Systems and Hypermedia Research Groups at the University of South Wales. Paul will be talking about the science behind knowing where we are and how to get places.

Poster for Paul Cripps

Poster for Paul Cripps

Since prehistory, humans have had a profound understanding of their surroundings and a deep sense of place.

Over millennia, we have developed ways of describing and documenting our world, sharing our journeys and planning routes.

This talk will explore this fascinating topic, taking in some of the major scientific advances driven by the need to know where we are and how to get places.

Paul Cripps is a specialist in geospatial technologies and has been working with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for twenty years. This has included projects investigating the positioning of sites and monuments in prehistory, modelling the spread of invasive species and spatial analysis to support development projects including the various A303 road schemes, the Stonehenge Visitor Centre and HS2.