Science news from the Guardian

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Science | The Guardian

Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2020

Latest Science news, comment and analysis from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice

Last feed update: Saturday July 11th, 2020 05:18:52 AM

Warning of serious brain disorders in people with mild coronavirus symptoms

Wednesday July 8th, 2020 07:44:30 AM Ian Sample Science editor
UK neurologists publish details of mildly affected or recovering Covid-19 patients with serious or potentially fatal brain conditions Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageDoctors may be missing signs of serious and potentially fatal brain disorders triggered by coronavirus, as they emerge in mildly affected or recovering patients, scientists have warned.Neurologists are on Wednesday publishing details of more than 40 UK Covid-19 patients whose complications ranged from brain inflammation and delirium to nerve damage and stroke. In some cases, the neurological problem was the patient’s first and main symptom. Continue reading...

Spacewatch: Nasa asteroid mission passes key milestone

Thursday July 9th, 2020 08:30:22 PM Stuart Clark
Design review stage passed for craft intended to visit iron-and-nickel mini-world in 2026Nasa’s mission to explore a metal-rich asteroid passed a key milestone in its development this week. The critical design review makes sure everyone is satisfied that the spacecraft will work as expected. Now that the review has been passed, engineers can begin making the various bits of spacecraft hardware in earnest, and the clock is ticking.They must be ready by February 2021 so that assembly and testing of the full spacecraft can begin. The main body of the spacecraft, called the solar electric propulsion (SEP) chassis, is already being built at Maxar Technologies in Palo Alto, California. The mission is due to launch in August 2026. Continue reading...

Noise control: sound wave system cancels out drum of traffic

Thursday July 9th, 2020 03:00:15 PM Nicola Davis
Windows can stay open say scientists behind speaker array that emits opposing pressure sound waves to counteract dinIf the hum of passing cars and the clatter of trains drives you to slam windows shut on a hot day, a new noise cancelling system could be music to your ears.Scientists have developed a sound control system that can be fitted on to an open window, allowing a breeze to waft in while sounds from outside are quietened. Continue reading...

How many contactable alien civilisations are out there? – podcast

Thursday July 9th, 2020 04:00:51 AM Presented by Nicola Davis and produced by David Waters
Could there really be other civilisations out there in the Milky Way? Nicola Davis talks to Prof Chris Conselice, whose recent work revises the decades-old Drake equation to throw new light on the possibility of contactable alien life existing in our galaxy Continue reading...

Scientists put forward plan to create universal species list

Tuesday July 7th, 2020 06:00:11 PM Patrick Greenfield
Single classification system could end centuries of disagreement and improve global efforts to tackle biodiversity loss A plan to create the first universally recognised list of species on Earth has prompted hopes of an end to centuries of disagreement and confusion over how to classify the world’s library of life.The 10-point plan aims to finally bring order with an authoritative list of the world’s species and a governance mechanism responsible for its quality. Researchers hope a single recognised list would improve global efforts to tackle biodiversity loss, the trade in endangered wildlife, biosecurity and conservation. Continue reading...

Miniature, insect-eating ancestor of dinosaurs unearthed in Madagascar

Tuesday July 7th, 2020 12:08:31 PM Reuters
Kongonaphon lived 237m years ago and paved way for gigantic successors, scientists sayA small, insect-eating reptile that lived 237m years ago was a miniature ancestor of the giant dinosaurs that went on to dominate the Earth, according to scientists examining fossils in Madagascar.The Kongonaphon kely measured about 40cm (16in) long and stood 10 cm (4in) tall at the hip, scientists said on Monday. It inhabited a floodplain region of what is now south-western Madagascar during the Triassic period about 237m years ago. Continue reading...

Covid-19 may cause brain complications in some, say doctors

Friday June 26th, 2020 07:26:07 AM Hannah Devlin Science correspondent
Stroke and psychosis found in small study of patients highlight need for researchCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageBrain complications, including stroke and psychosis, have been linked to Covid-19 in a study that raises concerns about the potentially extensive impact of the disease in some patients.The study is small and based on doctors’ observations, so cannot provide a clear overall picture about the rate of such complications. However, medical experts say the findings highlight the need to investigate the possible effects of Covid-19 in the brain and studies to explore potential treatments. Continue reading...

Scientists report flaws in WHO-funded study on 2-metre distancing

Sunday June 14th, 2020 03:07:56 PM Ian Sample Science editor
Mistakes mean findings should not be used as evidence for relaxing rule, say professorsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageSenior scientists have reported flaws in an influential World Health Organization-commissioned study into the risks of coronavirus infection and say it should not be used as evidence for relaxing the UK’s 2-metre physical distancing rule.Critics of the distancing advice, which states that people should keep at least 2 metres apart, believe it is too cautious. They seized on the research commissioned by the WHO, which suggested a reduction from 2 metres to 1 would raise infection risk only marginally, from 1.3% to 2.6%. Continue reading...

The first wave of Covid-19 is not over – but how might a second look?

Friday June 5th, 2020 10:40:23 AM Michael Safi
The pandemic’s future will be decided by human action and several unanswered questions about the nature of the virusCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageRestaurants are opening, parks are full and people are getting back to work: parts of Europe, Asia and much of the Middle East are enjoying the benefits of flattened coronavirus curves. Meanwhile, parts of the US, India and Latin America are still recording thousands of new cases every day.The first wave of the coronavirus is not over. The future shape of the pandemic will be decided both by human action, in the form of social distancing, testing and other traditional methods of disease control, but also several unanswered questions about the nature of the virus itself. Continue reading...

Covid-19: are pandemics becoming more common? – podcast

Tuesday May 19th, 2020 04:00:47 AM Presented by Ian Sampleproduced by David Waters and Madeleine Finlay
Ian Sample talks to Prof Kate Jones about whether the current coronavirus pandemic is part of a wider picture of increasing animal-to-human virus transmission. Are we are looking at a future where outbreaks of new infectious diseases become more common? Continue reading...

Coronavirus Australia: Victoria reports 216 new Covid-19 cases and death of man in his 90s

Saturday July 11th, 2020 04:58:30 AM Lisa Cox and Melissa Davey
Daniel Andrews says effects of lockdown won’t be reflected for weeks as NSW cases linked to Casula pubSign up for Guardian Australia’s coronavirus emailDownload the free Guardian app to get the most important news notificationsVictoria has recorded another 216 cases of coronavirus and one additional death, a man in his 90s, as the state tries to contain the second wave of the virus that returned Melbourne residents to lockdown.Thirty of the new cases are linked to known outbreaks and 186 are under investigation, with the state’s chief health officer, Brett Sutton, saying it was becoming more difficult to quickly trace the source of new infections. Continue reading...

Coronavirus live news: Australian state of Victoria reports 216 new cases as France exceeds 30,000 deaths

Saturday July 11th, 2020 04:31:09 AM Melissa Davey (now) and Lisa Cox (earlier)
San Quentin prison in US has seven deaths and 1,500 positive tests; Serbia has record 18 fatalities; Australia caps incoming flights and charges for quarantine 5.27am BST Thanks to one of our readers Tom, from Ukraine, who alerted me to the latest figures there. Yesterday’s coronavirus death count for Ukraine brought its weekly total to a new record. There have been 1,345 deaths overall there, and a record 118 deaths in the past week. 5.21am BST More details on the latest figures from Victoria, Australia.Asked about cluster details, Daniel Andrews said there'd be a full press release from the health department later today. It lists numbers by LGA - but there's no link to what cluster current cases are connected with. pic.twitter.com/TtgWG5B8kv Continue reading...

Coronavirus: Bogotá to re-enter strict lockdown – as it happened

Friday July 10th, 2020 11:38:29 PM Melissa Davey (now); Kevin Rawlinson, Martin Belam, Sarah Marsh, Fran Lawther, Amelia Hill and Helen Sullivan (earlier)
WHO reports worrying rise; second Venezuelan minister tests positive; Brazil records 1,200 more deathsIdlib’s first Covid-19 case sparks fear of fresh disasterScott Morrison says Australia will halve rate of international arrivals WHO inquiry aims to ‘stop the world being blindsided again’Disney World set to reopen despite coronavirus surge in Florida 12.38am BST This blog is closed – keep following coronavirus news at our new live blog. 12.12am BST US prison officials have announced California will release up to 8,000 people from state prisons to curb the spread of Covid-19 throughout the institutions.Officials on Friday announced three separate efforts, approved by the governor, Gavin Newsom, that they say will decrease the prison population by 8,ooo by the end of August. The measures mark the largest release efforts the state administration has taken since Covid-19 began to circulate among prison staff and incarcerated people. Related: California to release up to 8,000 prisoners to curb spread of coronavirus Continue reading...

Participants in UK coronavirus study could be monitored for up to 25 years

Friday July 10th, 2020 03:23:15 PM Nicola Davis
Experts say programme could follow participants for decades to look at long-term effects Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageParticipants in a study to understand the long-term and often unexpected effects of Covid-19 could be monitored for up to 25 years, researchers have said.As coronavirus swept the world, reports began to grow of people experiencing long-lasting symptoms including fatigue, breathlessness, coughs and chest pains – even for mild cases of the disease. Continue reading...

Fears as first Covid-19 case reported in rebel-held Syrian camps – as it happened

Thursday July 9th, 2020 11:45:49 PM Helen Sullivan (now and earlier) , Damien Gayle ,Sarah Marsh , Amy Walkerand Nadeem Badshah
WHO says pandemic is still accelerating; Hundreds of Romanians check themselves out of hospital; Serbia considers new lockdown. This blog is now closedFollow the latest global coronavirus live blog hereWHO says coronavirus pandemic still acceleratingWarning of Covid-19 ‘storm’ as pandemic accelerates across AfricaTrudeau and Trump’s responses see wildly different results 12.39am BST We’ve launched a new blog at the link below – head there for the latest: Related: Coronavirus live news: Bolivia president tests positive amid record rise in South Africa cases 12.05am BST South Africa announced Thursday its highest daily number of confirmed coronavirus cases with 13,674.Africas most developed country is now a hot spot in the global pandemic with 238,339 total confirmed cases. Gauteng province, which contains Johannesburg and the capital, Pretoria, is home to more than a third of the total cases.Health Minister Zweli Mkhize said South Africa could run out of available hospital beds within the month.The African continent has more than 523,000 confirmed virus cases after having passed the half-million mark on Wednesday. But shortages in testing materials mean the true number is unknown. Continue reading...

UC Berkeley reopening in doubt after 47 coronavirus cases tied to fraternity parties

Thursday July 9th, 2020 07:12:24 PM Mario Koran
Cases make it ‘harder to imagine bringing our campus community back’ as planned, university saysPlans for the fall semester at the University of California, Berkeley, are in question after 47 new Covid-19 cases tied to fraternity parties emerged in the past week. University officials warn the outbreak could jeopardize the ability to move forward with in-person classes in the months ahead.“We have seen the number of University Health Services positive cases increase from a running total of 23 since the start of the pandemic, to 47 new cases in just one week,” university officials wrote in a letter. Continue reading...

Bodies donated to science 'left to be eaten by rats at Paris centre'

Thursday July 9th, 2020 06:10:42 PM Agence France-Presse in Paris
Inquiry to examine claims remains were found strewn around and dismemberedAuthorities in France will investigate claims that human corpses donated for science were left to rot and be eaten by rats at a university research facility, the Paris prosecutor’s office has said.An investigation into “violations of the integrity of a corpse” was handed over to magistrates by prosecutors who handled the initial phase of the investigation after l’Express magazine reported the scandal last November. Continue reading...

Number of positive Covid-19 tests remains stable in England

Thursday July 9th, 2020 03:05:02 PM Ian Sample Science editor
An estimated 14,000 people had infection over past two weeks, according to ONS dataCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe number of people testing positive for Covid-19 has remained stable in England over the past two weeks, according to the Office for National Statistics, with an estimated 14,000 people having the infection.Test results from the coronavirus infection survey, which provides a weekly snapshot of community infections, confirmed the rapid fall in cases seen during the lockdown has plateaued. Importantly, cases do not yet appear to be rising again. Continue reading...

Hubble at 30: a view into our cosmos – podcast

Thursday July 2nd, 2020 04:00:42 AM Presented by Hannah Devlin and Ian Sample, and produced by Madeleine Finlay
Thirty years ago, the Hubble space telescope was shuttled into orbit, and has since provided us with astonishing images and insights into the universe. Earlier this year, Hannah Devlin spoke to one of the astronauts who helped launch Hubble, Kathy Sullivan. The first American woman to walk in space, Sullivan describes her journey to becoming an astronaut, why Hubble was such a vital mission and why it continues to be so important today Continue reading...

Covid-19: why R is a lot more complicated than you think – podcast

Tuesday June 30th, 2020 04:00:02 AM Presented by Nicola Davis and produced by Max Sanderson and Danielle Stephens
Over the last few months, we’ve all had to come to terms with R, the ‘effective reproduction number’, as a measure of how well we are dealing with the coronavirus outbreak. But, as Nicola Davis finds out from Dr Adam Kucharski, R is a complicated statistical concept that relies on many factors and, under some conditions, can be misleading Continue reading...

The Durrington shafts: a remarkable discovery for Stonehenge's neighbour – podcast

Thursday June 25th, 2020 04:00:34 AM Presented by Hannah Devlin and produced by India Rakusen
Archaeologists surveying the land around Stonehenge have made a discovery that could change the way we think about our neolithic ancestors: a circle of deep shafts spanning 1.2 miles in diameter around Durrington Walls. Hannah Devlin speaks to Prof Vincent Gaffney about how he and his team made this incredible discovery and why the latest find is so remarkable Continue reading...

Covid-19: how worried should smokers be? – podcast

Tuesday June 23rd, 2020 04:00:36 AM Presented by Sarah Boseley and produced by India Rakusen & Madeleine Finlay
With reports that there are lower rates of smokers being admitted to hospital with Covid-19 in France and trials to test whether nicotine patches can reduce the severity of infection, but also data showing that smokers are more likely to contract the disease and develop severe symptoms, what’s actually going on here? Sarah Boseley talks to Dr Nick Hopkinson to find out more Continue reading...

The week in wildlife - in pictures

Friday July 10th, 2020 03:46:16 PM Eric Hilaire
The pick of the world’s best flora and fauna photos, including a ring-tailed lemur and a spiky sea cucumber Continue reading...

The Next Great Migration by Sonia Shah review – movement is central to human history

Friday June 26th, 2020 06:30:42 AM Daniel Trilling
This nuanced study argues that far from being an unwelcome threat to global stability, migration and mixing are essential to human survival“A wild exodus has begun,” writes Sonia Shah early on in The Next Great Migration. “It is happening on every continent and in every ocean.” In response to the climate crisis, plants and animals that until recently scientists thought were fixed to a particular habitat have been seeking out different surroundings. Butterflies and birds have been edging their way towards the Earth’s poles; frogs and fungi are slowly climbing mountain ranges – while in the oceans, even some coral reefs are moving at the rate of a few kilometres per year. And where wild species go, humans may follow, Shah suggests, noting that more people already live outside their countries of birth than ever before, some of them pushed by war, floods, rising seas and creeping deserts. It sounds apocalyptic. But are we wrong to think so? Shah, a US science journalist, argues in a deeply researched and counterintuitive history that much received wisdom about migration – human or otherwise – rests on a series of misconceptions. We tend to see migration as unwelcome and rare, a flight from hardship or a burden for the place of arrival. But techniques including genetic history, navigational mapping and climatology have revealed that migration and mixing are far more central to life on Earth than previously thought. They may, in fact, “be our best shot at preserving biodiversity and resilient human societies”.  Continue reading...

Coronavirus vaccine tracker: How close are we to a vaccine?

Friday July 10th, 2020 03:40:25 PM Niko Kommenda and Frank Hulley-Jones
More than 140 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective coronavirus vaccineResearchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 140 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading...

Empathy machines: what will happen when robots learn to write film scripts?

Tuesday July 7th, 2020 09:08:33 AM Simon Stephenson
AI is on the march in the movie industry – but what would an android-written film actually look like? And will it be any good?A few years ago I moved to San Francisco, and almost everybody I met there immediately told me they were working on a startup. These startups all had the same innocent names – Swoon, Flow, Maker – and the same dreadful mission: to build AIs that automated some unfortunate human’s job. I always responded by pitching my own startup, Create. Create would build an AI that automated the creation of startups.The tech bros never cared for my joke, but I did. In fact, I cared for it so much that I eventually began a novel about an android who wanted to become a screenwriter. It seemed an intriguingly comic premise, because unlike everybody else’s job, my job was clearly far too human to ever actually be automated. Continue reading...

Councils need detailed data to contain Covid-19. Why have they been sidelined? | Chris Ham and Kate Ardern

Thursday July 9th, 2020 10:00:18 AM Chris Ham and Kate Ardern
The government’s preference for centralisation and the private sector has undermined England’s response to the pandemicCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe easing of the national lockdown has shifted the focus from central government to local authorities. Councils across England have made good progress in developing local outbreak plans and building capacity for contact tracing, working with Public Health England to decide how to manage outbreaks such as the one in Leicester.But the main challenge facing councils is accessing the data about what is happening in their areas. Andy Burnham, the mayor of Greater Manchester, recently expressed his concerns about this, describing the lack of patient-specific data available to councils like “local detectives being asked to solve crimes without being given the names of any of the victims or suspects”. Burnham asked Matt Hancock to share all the information he has on Covid-19 in Greater Manchester to enable local public health teams to do their job, echoing similar concerns expressed by the mayor of Leicester. Continue reading...

Trump is scooping up the world’s remdesivir. It’s a sign of things to come | Devi Sridhar

Saturday July 4th, 2020 11:00:11 AM Devi Sridhar
The case of the Covid-19 drug shows how national interests will continue to define the allocation of research productsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageDonald Trump has called Covid-19 a hoax, encouraged his followers to take hydroxychloroquine and threatened to cut all ties between the US and the World Health Organization. He has predicted that coronavirus will disappear one day, like a miracle, organised indoor rallies with no masks during the height of the pandemic and encouraged public health officials to slow down testing, because carrying out tests results in a larger number of confirmed cases. He has praised scientists for developing an HIV/Aids vaccine (which doesn’t exist), been accused of stealing 20 ventilators from Barbados and taking face masks from Germany and France.In this wild west moment in international relations, Trump boasted this week that the US had bought the world’s entire supply of remdesivir, the antiviral drug produced by the US biotechnology company Gilead. Remdesivir is one of the few proven medications for treating Covid-19 patients. Though low- and middle-income countries can still produce their own generic versions of the drug, European and other high-income countries are not able to buy remdesivir or produce it for three months. Fortunately the UK and Germany have stockpiled enough of the drug to treat all the patients who need it. Continue reading...

Love of science, not Trump's ignorance, will make America great again

Saturday July 4th, 2020 06:00:05 AM Ted Widmer
Amid a pandemic, the president rails against reason itself. The passions of his predecessors throw his failure into sharp reliefWe know what the temperature was in Philadelphia on 4 July 1776, because Thomas Jefferson wrote it down at 6am (68F), 9am (72.25F), 1pm (76F), and 9pm (73.5F). Even on this most important day, the author of the Declaration of Independence was never too busy to observe nature. Scientific language helped as he scratched out the words, claiming it was “self-evident” that people had rights, based on “the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God”. Related: US supreme court gives conservatives the blues but what's really going on? Continue reading...

The Guardian view on protecting the public: cover your face | Editorial

Thursday July 2nd, 2020 05:28:36 PM Editorial
Scotland is right to mandate masks or similar coverings in shops. Wearing them can save livesWicked. Horrific. An affront to British liberties. Proposals to make wearing seatbelts compulsory were angrily opposed in the early 1970s. Some warned that it might make motorists more reckless, or endanger unborn babies. MPs claimed there was no real evidence of the benefits. Others complained it would be uncomfortable for women or the elderly. It took years of political battle to change the law, saving tens of thousands of lives.In retrospect, the outrage looks not merely mistaken but utterly bizarre. Wearing a seatbelt is simply a matter of course now. Yet similar claims have been heard in this pandemic when it comes to wearing masks. The World Health Organization insisted there was not enough evidence to recommend their routine use, changing its advice only last month. Other officials warned that mask-wearers might be lulled into a false sense of security, and would fail to distance themselves from others. There was real and understandable concern that mass purchases would leave no protection for medics and other frontline workers who desperately needed it. But this disparagement of masks may have come at a cost. Continue reading...

Forget any false sense of security: we are still at the start of the global pandemic | Jeremy Farrar

Thursday July 2nd, 2020 11:50:57 AM Jeremy Farrar
Until every country is protected, we are all at risk. Only effective vaccines and treatments will allow us to eradicate coronavirus• Dr Jeremy Farrar is director of the Wellcome TrustSix months on from the first cases of Covid-19 emerging in Wuhan, many of us in Britain will be feeling a mixture of relief and trepidation as England’s lockdown eases. The loosening of restrictions, alongside warmer weather, has brought hope. The UK government is understandably anxious to get society and the economy back on track. This is what we all want, and it’s what scientists are striving to ensure.Since the virus began to ripple across the world, scientists have worked at incredible speed to deepen our understanding of Covid-19. There have been advances in record time; more than 200 vaccine candidates are already in development, and a treatment identified, dexamethasone, that we now know saves lives. We’ve achieved in months what would normally take decades. Continue reading...

Did you solve it? The broken vase

Monday June 29th, 2020 03:59:39 PM Alex Bellos
The shattering solutions to today’s puzzlesEarlier today I set the following three puzzles:1. With two straight line cuts, divide the vase into three pieces that can be reassembled to form a square. Continue reading...

Can you solve it? The broken vase

Monday June 29th, 2020 06:10:00 AM Alex Bellos
Smashed it!My puzzle book So You Think You’ve Got Problems is out in paperback this week. Here are three problems from it. The first is about a vase, the second is about a leg, and third is about a set of keys.1. With two straight line cuts, divide the vase into three pieces that can be reassembled to form a square. Continue reading...

Did you solve it? Domino dancing

Monday June 15th, 2020 04:00:18 PM Alex Bellos
The solution to today’s puzzleEarlier today, I set this puzzle:Is it possible to cover an 8x8 chessboard with 32 dominos (which are each a 1x2 block) in such a way that any line parallel to a side of the chessboard always passes through the interior of at least one of the dominoes? Continue reading...

Can you solve it? Domino dancing

Monday June 15th, 2020 06:10:06 AM Alex Bellos
A riddle about rectanglesUPDATE: To read solution click hereIt’s a sin! Yes, I used a picture of the Pet Shop Boys to entrap you into reading my puzzle column. What did you do to deserve it?Today’s poser (no, not him) concerns the playful positioning of domino-shaped tiles on a chessboard. Continue reading...

SpaceX successfully launches manned rocket into orbit – video

Sunday May 31st, 2020 11:35:04 AM
A rocket ship named Dragon breathed new fire into the US’s human spaceflight programme on Saturday, carrying two astronauts on a much-anticipated mission. The launch of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon crew capsule from Florida’s Kennedy Space Center to the International Space Station was the first time since 2011 that humans had blasted off into orbit from US soil.It also heralded a new direction for crewed spaceflight, as entrepreneur Elon Musk’s company SpaceX became the first commercial operator to carry astronauts into space under a public-private partnership set up by Nasa in 2010SpaceX successfully launches Nasa astronauts into orbit Continue reading...

Cracking the Cryptic: sudoku solvers become unlikely YouTube sensation – video

Friday May 22nd, 2020 01:59:05 PM
A YouTube channel dedicated to solving tricky sudoku puzzles has become an unlikely viral hit. Cracking the Cryptic has become a lockdown fixture for millions who tune in to watch Simon Anthony and Mark Goodliffe work through seemingly impossible puzzles. The channel's latest hit is The Miracle Sudoku, a strangely compelling 25-minute video in which Anthony takes on what he believes to be an impossible gridPuzzled men become internet sensation with sudoku channel Continue reading...

Tasmanian tiger: newly released footage captures last-known vision of thylacine – video

Tuesday May 19th, 2020 06:34:59 AM
Newly released footage captures the last known moving images of the evasive thylacine (Tasmanian tiger). Shot in 1935, the footage has been released to the public after it was digitally restored by the National Film and Sound Archive of Australia. Unseen for 85 years, the 21 seconds come from a 1935 travelogue, Tasmania the Wonderland, believed to be shot by Sidney Cook. The vision captures 'Benjamin', the last-known surviving thylacine at Beaumaris Zoo in Hobart. Confirmation the video was shot in 1935 makes it the most recent moving images of the animal, after the previous last-confirmed footage was shot in December 1933. 'Benjamin' died in 1937, 18 months after this footage was captured Continue reading...

Eta Aquarids meteor shower May 2020: comet dust puts on a show – in pictures

Wednesday May 6th, 2020 03:40:04 AM
Australian photographer Christian Bowman from Queensland was among Australians waking up before the sun rose to capture images of the Eta Aquarids meteor showerAustralians told to look to the skies early Wednesday for best views Continue reading...

April pink full moon: readers' photos of the supermoon

Thursday April 9th, 2020 04:14:27 AM
A supermoon happens when the moon reaches the closest point to Earth in its 27-day orbit and it happens to be full, which usually occurs once a year. We asked you to share your shots of April’s lunar spectacular. Here’s a selection of our favourites Continue reading...

'Bigger and brighter' supermoon graces night sky – video

Wednesday April 8th, 2020 07:16:34 AM
The largest, brightest full moon in nearly seven decades started to show on Tuesday evening over Europe, Latin America, the US and the Middle East. This year, the supermoon was expected to come nearer to Earth than at any time since 1948, astronomers have said. A supermoon occurs when the timing of a full moon overlaps with the point in the moon's 28-day orbit that is closest to Earth, and about every 14th full moon is a supermoon. If skies are clear, this time the full moon will appear up to 14% bigger and 30% brighter than usual, according to Nasa Continue reading...






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