Calendar

For information about attending a Salisbury Cafe Scientifique event, see the Attending an Event section; there is also more general information in the Frequently Asked Questions section and help on making the most of this calendar in the Calendar Help section. If you fancy a night of science outside but close to Salisbury, there is also this filtered list of nearby events.

May
20
Mon
2019
Welcome and Introduction – Christie Marr (Isaac Newton Institute); Jane Leeks (Newton Gateway to Mathematics)
May 20 @ 10:00 am – 10:10 am
Welcome and Introduction – Christie Marr (Isaac Newton Institute); Jane Leeks (Newton Gateway to Mathematics)
May 20 @ 10:00 am – 10:10 am
Outline and Summary of INI Research Programme 'The Mathematical Design of New Materials' – Miha Ravnik (University of Ljubljana ; Jozef Stefan Institute)
May 20 @ 10:10 am – 10:20 am
Outline and Summary of INI Research Programme 'The Mathematical Design of New Materials' – Miha Ravnik (University of Ljubljana ; Jozef Stefan Institute)
May 20 @ 10:10 am – 10:20 am
Design Innovations and Challenges for Photonics and Electronics Materials – Tim Wilkinson (University of Cambridge)
May 20 @ 10:20 am – 10:55 am
Design Innovations and Challenges for Photonics and Electronics Materials – Tim Wilkinson (University of Cambridge)
May 20 @ 10:20 am – 10:55 am
Design Challenges in Transistor Technologies for Flexible Displays and Thin Film Applications – Henning Sirringhaus (FlexEnable; University of Cambridge)
May 20 @ 10:55 am – 11:25 am
Design Challenges in Transistor Technologies for Flexible Displays and Thin Film Applications – Henning Sirringhaus (FlexEnable; University of Cambridge)
May 20 @ 10:55 am – 11:25 am
Help! Liquid Crystal Device Physicist Without Mathematical Skill Seeks Solutions to Various Problems – Cliff Jones (Dynamic Vision Systems Ltd; University of Leeds)
May 20 @ 11:45 am – 12:15 pm
Help! Liquid Crystal Device Physicist Without Mathematical Skill Seeks Solutions to Various Problems – Cliff Jones (Dynamic Vision Systems Ltd; University of Leeds)
May 20 @ 11:45 am – 12:15 pm
Mathematical Innovations for Drug Design – Lucy Colwell (University of Cambridge)
May 20 @ 12:15 pm – 12:50 pm
Mathematical Innovations for Drug Design – Lucy Colwell (University of Cambridge)
May 20 @ 12:15 pm – 12:50 pm
Men of eminence: science, photography and biography in the self-fashioning of Robert Hunt in 19th-century England – James Ryan (Victoria & Albert Museum/University of Exeter)
May 20 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

This paper considers the way the one Victorian man of science – Robert Hunt (1807–1887) – employed biography and the photographic portrait in his wider self-fashioning. A chemist, experimental researcher on light and photography, folklorist, geologist and writer, Hunt manoeuvred his way from humble beginnings in Devon and Cornwall to the relative heights of metropolitan science in mid-19th century London. He used his talents in chemistry, photography and writing, together with support from powerful patrons, to enter the world of science and social respectability. He is a good example of men who, through their talents, exertions and institutional networks, forged careers in professional science in this period. Like many such men, Hunt lacked the gentlemanly background that had hitherto dominated the world of science. While Hunt’s experiments in genres of science writing and his romantic geological interests have recently received scholarly attention, notably from historian of science Melanie Keane, the connections between his literary exertions and his experiments in visual culture have been little studied. This paper considers Robert Hunt’s own photographic image and how he used the art of biography to write himself into the history of science. It pays particular attention to Hunt’s work in one particular experimental photographic and biographical publication: photographic portraits of men of eminence in literature, science and art, with biographical memoirs, published in six volumes from 1863 to 1867, with photographs by Ernest Edwards, edited by Lovell Augustus Reeve (1814–1865) and E. Walford. In doing so the paper seeks to open up questions about the significance of the photographic portrait and biography in the cultural framing of scientific, gender and class identities in mid-19th century Britain.

The opportunities for sensors in physiologically relevant organ on a chip devices – Malcolm Wilkinson, Kirkstall Ltd
May 20 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

Organ on a chip technology is creating a lot of interest in the academic and industrial community – but what actually is an ‘organ on a chip’?

There are few standards and a divergence of opinions about what is the most important factor to ensure that the technology actually moves from lab curiosity to mainstream application. This presentation aims to explain the origins of the technology and clarify the requirements of several of the leading applications.

Many applications need long term cell culture rather than a quick go/no go toxicity assay. Live cell monitoring provides many opportunities for novel biosensors and imaging technologies.

The presentation will close with a review on the status of several leading commercial approaches to organ on a chip.

Where Do New Medicines Come From? Mechanistic Modelling and Simulation for Bispecific Antibodies – Armin Sepp (GlaxoSmithKline)
May 20 @ 2:20 pm – 2:50 pm
Where Do New Medicines Come From? Mechanistic Modelling and Simulation for Bispecific Antibodies – Armin Sepp (GlaxoSmithKline)
May 20 @ 2:20 pm – 2:50 pm
Mathematics of Self-Healing Materials with Exchangeable Bonds – Eugene Terentjev (University of Cambridge)
May 20 @ 2:50 pm – 3:25 pm
Mathematics of Self-Healing Materials with Exchangeable Bonds – Eugene Terentjev (University of Cambridge)
May 20 @ 2:50 pm – 3:25 pm
‘shuttle catalysis – a conceptual blueprint for reversible functional group transfer’ – Professor Bill Morandi, ETH Zurich
May 20 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Abstract not available

Developing Liquid Crystalline Aerogels for Thermal Insulation in Buildings – Ivan Smalyukh (University of Colorado)
May 20 @ 4:15 pm – 4:40 pm
Developing Liquid Crystalline Aerogels for Thermal Insulation in Buildings – Ivan Smalyukh (University of Colorado)
May 20 @ 4:15 pm – 4:40 pm
The mechanics and biophysics of getting in touch – Miriam Goodman, Beckmann Center for Molecular and Genetic Medicine, Stanford University, California, USA
May 20 @ 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm

Touch is the first sense to develop, the last to fade and the least well understood of the five basic senses. For decades, we have understood that ion channels were the first responders of touch sensation—converting the mechanical energy delivered in a touch or the bend of a limb into neural signals. Yet, the identity of the proteins forming such proteins remained elusive. Research in my group and others has identified at least three classes of proteins that can form these so-called mechanoelectrical transduction (MeT) channels in mammals and invertebrates—DEG/ENaC sodium channels, TRP cation channels, and Piezo cation channels. We are working to expand our knowledge of how MeT channels depend on biophysics of force transfer for activation (Eastwood et al, PNAS 2015; Sanzeni et al, BioRxiv 2019; Katta et al, BioRxiv 2019) and continuing to investigate the protein partners that make these channels.

My talk will survey prior knowledge and discuss our recent investigations applying the tools of genetic dissection and quantitative mechanical models to the biophysics of in vivo MeT channel activation using C. elegans nematodes as a tractable model.

Dicussion and Questions –
May 20 @ 4:40 pm – 5:00 pm
Dicussion and Questions –
May 20 @ 4:40 pm – 5:00 pm
May
21
Tue
2019
How perception informs urgent saccadic choices: halting, acceleration, and deceleration – Emilio Salinas (Wake Forest School of Medicine)
May 21 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

The choice of where to look next is guided by current perceptual information as well as internal factors such as motivation, current goals, prior experience, etc. I will discuss the development and testing of a mechanistic framework that describes how perceptual and motor-planning processes dynamically interact and give rise to saccadic choices. In traditional studies of choice behavior, a decision based on sensory information is made first and is then followed by a motor report. Choices conceived in such a serial fashion progress slowly (hundreds of ms) — but under natural viewing conditions the median time between gaze fixations is short (200–250 ms), and the next saccade is always being planned. Our approach is to manipulate time pressure to reveal how perception and attention guide saccadic choices under more temporally realistic conditions, i.e., when the perceptual evaluation occurs rapidly (< 50 ms) and informs oculomotor plans that are already ongoing. By combining behavioral, neurophysiological, and theoretical work, we have developed a modeling framework that (1) is applicable to a wide range of urgent-choice tasks, (2) replicates rich psychophysical data in great detail, and (3) is firmly consistent with activity recorded in the frontal eye field (FEF). In this framework, perception influences ongoing target selection by halting, accelerating, or decelerating developing motor activity. These three forms of dynamical interaction explain in quantitative detail the rapid temporal variations in psychometric performance observed in our urgent tasks; for example, how exogenous (saliency-driven) and endogenous (rule-driven) influences compete when the goal is to look away from a salient stimulus.

A local weak limit approach to the study of graphical data – Prof. Venkat Anantharam, University of California, Berkeley
May 21 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

By *graphical data*, we mean data indexed by the vertices and edges of a sparse graph rather than by linearly ordered time. Just as a stochastic process is a stochastic model for a time series got by picking a time index at random and viewing how the time series looks from that time
index, in the local weak limit theory one studies graphical data by picking a node of the graph at random and seeing how the data looks from the point of view of that node. What results is a so-called sofic distribution on rooted marked graphs.

Bordenave and Caputo (2014) defined a notion of entropy for probability distributions on rooted graphs with finite expected degree at the root.
We call this BC entropy. We develop the parallel result for probability distributions on marked rooted graphs. Our graphs have vertex marks drawn from a finite set and directed edge marks, one towards each vertex, drawn from a finite set.

We develop the details of our generalization of BC entropy to the case of rooted marked graphs. We then illustrate the value of this viewpoint by proving a universal lossless data compression theorem analogous to the basic universal lossless data compression theorem for time series.
We also prove, for graphical data, an analog of the Slepian-Wolf theorem of distributed compression for Erdos-Renyi and configuration model ensembles.

This is joint work with Payam Delgosha.

Not a jet all the way: discovery prospects using substructure – Deepak Kar (University of Witwatersrand) @ Ryle Seminar Room (Rutherford 930)
May 21 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Jet substructure techniques for new physics searches have become mainstream in the last decade, however precise theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of substructure observables have been sparse. We will talk about the most extensive such measurement made by ATLAS, and what we learn from comparison of different model predictions. As we have not seen any signatures of new physics so far, it is imperative that we look at unusual and experimentally challenging topologies. The boosted heavy neutrino search in ATLAS looked at a large-radius jet containing an electron as a physics object for the first time, which will be discussed.

Rothschild Distinguished Visiting Fellow Lecture: Optimality of Algorithms for Approximation/Computation – Ronald DeVore (Texas A&M University )
May 21 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Rothschild Distinguished Visiting Fellow Lecture: Optimality of Algorithms for Approximation/Computation – Ronald DeVore (Texas A&M University )
May 21 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Twistor fishnets – Tim Adamo (Imperial College London) @ MR11
May 21 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Abstract not available