Calendar

For information about attending a Salisbury Cafe Scientifique event, see the Attending an Event section; there is also more general information in the Frequently Asked Questions section and help on making the most of this calendar in the Calendar Help section. If you fancy a night of science outside but close to Salisbury, there is also this filtered list of nearby events.

Oct
28
Mon
2019
Cancer: when friends become foes, and how to make them friends again – Professor Gerard Evan FRS FMedSci, Sir William Dunn Professor of Biochemistry, Department of Biochemistry
Oct 28 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Abstract not available

Artificial Intelligence in Opthalmology – Dr. Pearce Keane, Moorfields Eye Hospital
Oct 28 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

*The Moorfields-DeepMind Collaboration*

Ophthalmology is among the most technology-driven of the all the medical specialties, with treatments utilizing high-spec medical lasers and advanced microsurgical techniques, and diagnostics involving ultra-high resolution imaging. Ophthalmology is also at the forefront of many trailblazing research areas in healthcare, such as stem cell therapy, gene therapy, and – most recently – artificial intelligence. In July 2016, Moorfields announced a formal collaboration with the world’s leading artificial intelligence company, DeepMind. This collaboration involves the sharing of >1,000,000 anonymised retinal scans with DeepMind to allow for the automated diagnosis of diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR). In my presentation, I will describe the motivation – and urgent need – to apply deep learning to ophthalmology, the processes required to establish a research collaboration between the NHS and a company like DeepMind, the initial results of our research, and finally, why I believe that ophthalmology could be the first branch of medicine to be fundamentally reinvented through the application of artificial intelligence.

All welcome – free for CSAR members, £2 for undergraduates, postgraduates and recent PhDs, £5 for non-members.

“Add to calendar”:https://www.addevent.com/event/?AW3787987

“Find out more about this event”:https://www.csar.org.uk/lectures/lectures-2019-2020/tbc-28oct2019/

“Find out more about CSAR membership”:http://www.csar.org.uk/membership/

Oct
30
Wed
2019
Wataching Molecules in Action – Professor Sir David Klenerman FRS FMedSci, Christ’s College
Oct 30 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

A major advance in the physical sciences in the last two decades has been the development of quantitative methods to directly observe individual molecules in solution, attached to surfaces, in the membrane of live cells or more recently inside live cells. These single molecule fluorescence studies have now reached a stage where they can provide new insights into important biological and biomedical problems. After presenting the principles of these methods, he will give some examples from current research. He has used single molecule fluorescence to detect and characterise the low concentrations of soluble protein aggregates that play a key role in the initiation and spreading of Alzheimer’s disease. This provides new insights into how these aggregates damage neurons. He will then describe how fundamental science aimed at watching single molecules incorporating nucleotides into DNA gave rise to a new rapid method to sequence DNA that is now widely used.

Nov
11
Mon
2019
100 Years of Universes – Professor John D Barrow, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics
Nov 11 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Abstract not available

The Next Generation of Children – Professor Lucy Raymond, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge
Nov 11 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

*How children with rare diseases can be helped by whole genome sequence analysis.*

All welcome – free for CSAR members, £2 for undergraduates, postgraduates and recent PhDs, £5 for non-members.

“Add to calendar”:https://www.addevent.com/event/?af3803299

“Find out more about this event”:https://www.csar.org.uk/lectures/lectures-2019-2020/tbc-11nov2019/

“Find out more about CSAR membership”:http://www.csar.org.uk/membership/

Nov
25
Mon
2019
The Spirit of Inquiry: how the Cambridge Philosophical Society shaped modern science – Dr Susannah Gibson, Author of "The Spirit of Inquiry" 200 years of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
Nov 25 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Abstract not available

Jan
13
Mon
2020
Air pollution and human health. Lessons learnt and challenges ahead. – Professor Frank Kelly, Department of Analytical, Environmental and Forensic Sciences, King’s College London
Jan 13 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

All welcome – free for CSAR members, £2 for undergraduates, postgraduates and recent PhDs, £5 for non-members.

“Add to calendar”:https://www.addevent.com/event/?uo3919122

“Find out more about this event”:https://www.csar.org.uk/lectures/lectures-2019-2020/13jan2020/

“Find out more about CSAR membership”:http://www.csar.org.uk/membership/

Jan
17
Fri
2020
Human Origins – Dr Adam Rutherford, Author, Broadcaster
Jan 17 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Abstract not available

Jan
24
Fri
2020
Mysteries of Modern Physics – Professor Sean Carroll, Caltech
Jan 24 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

One of the great intellectual achievements of the twentieth century was the theory of quantum mechanics, according to which observational results can only be predicted probabilistically rather than with certainty. Yet, after decades in which the theory has been successfully used on an everyday basis, most physicists would agree that we still don’t truly understand what it means. I will talk about the source of this puzzlement, and explain why an increasing number of physicists are led to an apparently astonishing conclusion: that the world we experience is constantly branching into different versions, representing the different possible outcome of quantum measurements. This could have important consequences for quantum gravity and the emergence of spacetime.

Sean Carroll is a theoretical physicist at the California Institute of Technology, and an External Professor at the Santa Fe Institute. He is the host of the weekly Mindscape podcast. He is the author of several books, most recently Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime.

Jan
27
Mon
2020
G I TAYLOR LECTURE – Professor Nigel Peake – title to be confirmed – Professor Nigel Peake, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics
Jan 27 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Abstract not available

Pioneering genetic therapies for Huntington’s disease and its relevance for neurodegeneration – Professor Sarah Tabrizi, University College London
Jan 27 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

*An overview of antisense oligonucleotide therapies in development for neurodegenerative diseases.*

There are no effective disease modifying therapies for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s (AD), Parkinson’s (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Huntington’s disease (HD). Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease and the genetic predictability of HD provides an opportunity for early therapeutic intervention many years before overt symptom onset and at a time when reversal or prevention of neural dysfunction may still be possible. As HD is monogenetic, fully penetrant, and characterised by a long premanifest phase, it is emerging as a potential model for studying therapeutic intervention in other neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease where no preclinical diagnostic tests exist. In addition, HD manifests with a broad range of clinical symptoms and signs, many of them common to these other diseases, and involves widespread pathology throughout most of the brain involving similar protein misfolding. Understanding of HD pathogenesis is evolving, and I will present an overview of important approaches in development for targeting mutant HTT DNA and RNA, the cause of HD pathogenesis, and in particular I will present our recent successful phase 1b/2a clinical trial testing the effects of antisense oligonucleotide therapy (ASO) with RG6042 (formerly known as IONIS HTT Rx) in patients with early Huntington’s Disease and present the results of the first successful HTT-lowering drug trial (Tabrizi et al New England Journal of Medicine 2019). This study is the first to demonstrate antisense-mediated protein suppression in patients with a neurodegenerative disease. While this particular ASO holds great promise for HD, our findings have broader implications. These data suggest that antisense technology has the potential to provide disease-modifying benefits in other neurodegenerative diseases associated with aberrant production of proteins, including ALS, Alzheimer’s disease and many other diseases that currently lack adequate treatments. In my talk I will review ASO approaches in development for CNS diseases.

All welcome – free for CSAR members, £2 for undergraduates, postgraduates and recent PhDs, £5 for non-members.

“Add to calendar”:https://www.addevent.com/event/?hB3803314

“Find out more about this event”:https://www.csar.org.uk/lectures/lectures-2019-2020/huntingtons/

“Find out more about CSAR membership”:http://www.csar.org.uk/membership/

Jan
31
Fri
2020
Decoding the Heavens: The Antikythera Mechanism – Dr Jo Marchant, Journalist, Author
Jan 31 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Abstract not available

Feb
7
Fri
2020
Alan Turing and the Enigma Machine – Dr James Grime, Mathematician, Lecturer
Feb 7 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Alan Turing was one of our great 20th century mathematicians, and a pioneer of computer science. However, he may best be remembered as one of the leading code breakers of Bletchley Park during World War II. It was Turing’s brilliant insights and mathematical mind that helped to break Enigma, the apparently unbreakable code used by the German military. We present a history of both Alan Turing and the Enigma, leading up to this fascinating battle of man against machine – including a full demonstration of an original WWII Enigma Machine!

Dr James Grime is a mathematician and public speaker. James now runs The Enigma Project and travels the world giving public talks on the history and mathematics of codes and code breaking. James is also a presenter of the YouTube channel numberphile.

Feb
10
Mon
2020
A V HILL LECTURE – Professor Eske Willerslev – title to be confirmed – Professor Eske Willerslev, Lundbeck Foundation GeoGenetics Centre, Copenhagen
Feb 10 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Abstract not available

A Global Learning Crisis – Using tablets to get one billion children reading – Andrew Ashe, onebillion
Feb 10 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

*An evening with one of Elon Musk’s Global Learning XPRIZE winners.*

There is a global crisis in education. One in six children is not able to read, write, or do maths. The impact of illiteracy on a child, their community and the global community is severe, affecting health, social mobility and economic stability. As communication and daily life becomes more reliant on literacy and digital literacy, these skills become even more crucial for children to become equipped to be lifelong learners, and future problem solvers. According to the UN, we need 24.4 million more primary school teachers in order to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 4 – quality education for all – by 2030.

Andrew will discuss how we – as a community of governments, NGOs, children, communities, teachers and parents – can do this, as well as the red herrings, archaic models and circumstantial barriers that risk preventing SDG4 from being achieved.

Viable solutions for global education are here, and we need to implement them.

All welcome – free for CSAR members, £2 for undergraduates, postgraduates and recent PhDs, £5 for non-members.

“Add to calendar”:https://www.addevent.com/event/?Mu3803320

“Find out more about this event”:https://www.csar.org.uk/lectures/lectures-2019-2020/tbc-10feb2020/

“Find out more about CSAR membership”:http://www.csar.org.uk/membership/

Feb
14
Fri
2020
The Enigma of Emotion – Dr Tiffany Watt Smith, Queen Mary, University of London
Feb 14 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

How did people once die of nostalgia? Why did Victorians invent boredom? And why did a self-help author in the 16th century encourage his readers to practice feeling sad?

The stories we tell ourselves about our emotions are shaped not just by our personal circumstances, but by pervasive and often invisible cultural and political forces.

This lecture will explore the field of the history of emotions, and how the values and ideas associated with emotions have changed – and continue to do so – intimately shaping the way we feel.

Dr Tiffany Watt Smith is the author of three books about the history emotions, Schadenfreude (2018), The Book of Human Emotions (2015) which tells the stories of 154 emotions from around the world, and On Flinching (2013). Her books have so far been translated into 10 languages. Educated at the universities of Cambridge and London, she is now based at Queen Mary University of London where she is a Reader in Cultural History and a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for the History of Emotions. Her writing has appeared in The Guardian, the BBC News Magazine and The New Scientist among others. In 2014, she was named a BBC New Generation Thinker. In her previous career, she was a theatre director. Her TED talk ’The History of Human Emotions’ has been viewed by more than 3 million people.

Feb
21
Fri
2020
The Enigmatic Premodern Book – Dr Erik Kwakkel, University of British Columbia
Feb 21 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

The defining feature of the medieval manuscript—the premodern book at the heart of this lecture—is that its contents have been written rather than printed. A compelling feature of written text from the medieval period is that it produces two kinds of meaning. The first is the meaning of the words themselves: the most common reason for consulting a manuscript and the reason why it was produced in the first place. The other kind is hidden within the shape of the letters. As they copied a text, scribes included information about themselves in their handwriting. How the individual letters were formed depended on a range of variables, including the location and approximate moment of the scribe’s training, the institution in which the manuscript was produced, and even with how much care a text was copied. This is the enigma of the medieval manuscript: a wealth of information is enclosed in its material design, if we can decipher the code. What methods are available to untangle this enigma? What knowledge can be gleaned from how the medieval book was put together? Why is looking at this object as useful as reading it?

Erik Kwakkel is Professor in the History of the Book at the School of Information, The University of British Columbia. He is a member of the Comité international de paléographie latine and among his recent monographs is Books Before Print (Arc Humanities Press 2018).

Feb
24
Mon
2020
Professor Rebecca Kilner – title to be confirmed – Professor Rebecca Kilner, Department of Zoology
Feb 24 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Abstract not available

Feb
26
Wed
2020
HONORARY FELLOWS LECTURE – Professor David Baulcombe FRS- title to be confirmed – Professor Sir David Baulcombe, Department of Plant Sciences
Feb 26 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Abstract not available

Feb
28
Fri
2020
Eruptions, emissions and enigmas: from fuming volcanic vents to mass extinction events – Professor Tamsin Mather, University of Oxford
Feb 28 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Volcanoes are spectacular natural phenomena. Earth has experienced
volcanism since its beginnings and observing a volcanic eruption is a
truly primeval experience. Volcanoes have shaped our planet and have
been key in creating and maintaining its habitability. However, they can
also be deadly natural hazards and are implicated in some of the
greatest environment crises in Earth’s history, such as mass extinction
events. Professor Tamsin Mather will explore some of the different types
of volcanic activity that we see on present-day Earth and have seen over
our planet’s geological history. She will discuss how lessons learnt
sitting on the edge of an active volcano today can give us insights into
some of the enigmas surrounding the most profound environmental changes
in geological history including mass extinction events.

Tamsin is a volcanologist and Professor of Earth Sciences at the
University of Oxford, UK where she has been on the faculty since 2006.
She has Masters degrees in Chemistry and History and Philosophy of
Science from the University of Cambridge. After a year working in
Germany and then Brussels doing a placement for the European Commission,
she returned to Cambridge completing a PhD on the atmospheric chemistry
of volcanic plumes and their environmental effects in 2004. Since then
her research has broadened to explore the diverse ways in which
volcanoes interact with Earth’s environment, the processes driving
volcanic unrest and eruptions, the hazards they pose and their resource
potential. Before joining Oxford she was a Research Council Fellow at
the UK Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology, and a Royal
Society Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellow. She won a UNESCO/L’Oréal UK &
Ireland Women in Science award in 2008, the Philip Leverhulme prize in
2010, was UK Mineralogical Society Distinguished Lecturer in 2015/16 and
the winner of the 2018 Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture from the
Royal Society. She has spoken at numerous science festivals including
New Scientist Live and the Cheltenham Science Festival and participated
in several TV and radio programmes and documentaries including Radio 4’s
Life Scientific with Jim Al-Khalili and The Infinite Monkey Cage with
Brian Cox.

Mar
6
Fri
2020
Archaeological Mysteries – Dr Albert Yu-Min Lin, Explorer
Mar 6 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Abstract not available

Mar
9
Mon
2020
Let food be thy medicine. – Professor Nita Forouhi, MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge
Mar 9 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

*Diet and nutrition for the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes.*

“Add to calendar”:https://www.addevent.com/event/?qs3838403

“Find out more about this event”:https://www.csar.org.uk/lectures/lectures-2019-2020/tbc-09mar2020/

“Find out more about CSAR membership”:http://www.csar.org.uk/membership/

Mar
20
Fri
2020
The Futures of Medicine – One Day meeting – Organisers: Professor Ashok Venkitaraman and Dr James Fraser @ Cambridge University Engineering Department LT0
Mar 20 @ 9:00 am – 5:15 pm

Abstract not available

May
4
Mon
2020
Dieselgate: The Inside Story – John German, International Council on Clean Transportation
May 4 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

*What did we learn? What have we changed? What else is waiting for us?*

All welcome – free for CSAR members, £2 for undergraduates, postgraduates and recent PhDs, £5 for non-members.

“Add to calendar”:https://www.addevent.com/event/?eR3938775

“Find out more about this event”:https://www.csar.org.uk/lectures/lectures-2019-2020/tbc-11may2020/

“Find out more about CSAR membership”:http://www.csar.org.uk/membership/